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Job Prospects for a couple

Joined
Apr 15, 2015
Messages
5
Hi everyone!

I'm glad to finally join the other JREF :D .

I would like to live in Japan for at least a year, perhaps up to three years. I'm not sure I could permanently live there due to the crushing work hours, but I'm very bored living in Brisbane Australia and would definitely like to try living in Japan before I die.

I'm not married but I might as well be and have been living with my female partner for 3-4 years. Marriage is a formality we haven't done yet. Therefore she must come with me (or rather, I won't go without her).

I would like some advice on the best way forward.

We have traveled to Japan six times over the last 4 years (total of 16 weeks).

We live in Brisbane Australia. I'll give figures in yen but it's just converted from AUD.

Current Situation:
Myself:
Age: 24
Degree: BSc (Geological Sciences)
English: Native
Japanese: passed JLPT N2 in 2013, working towards JLPT N1 (might do the test this year).
Job: Government/Science: 6.8 million yen (75,000AUD) + 12.75% for retirement - 36.25hours/week [completly flexible across 5 days] - 20 days annual leave + 11 public holidays + 10 paid sick leave days /year
I'm currently studying a Master of Information Technology (focus on Software Engineering and Networking/OS) part time due for completion at the end of 2016. I'm at a bit of a dead end with my current job hence the IT degree.

Partner:
Age: 24
Degree: BSc (Mathematics- focus on physics)
English: Native
Japanese: None
Job: Banking : 6.8 million yen (75,000AUD) + 9% for retirement + Bonus (~1-2 million yen) - 40 hours/week - 20 days annual leave + 11 public holidays + 10 paid sick leave days /year

(We also both buy an extra 1-2 weeks leave at the moment.)

We've been working for a little over 3 years now and have assets of about 13 million yen. We don't spend much compared to other people our age mainly because we both grew up very poor so we haven't broken our frugal habits. We were lucky to go to good universities thanks to the interest free loans the Australian government offers.

I mention all the financial stuff because I think It would be hard to justify moving if we end up in a much worse position financially and work/life balance speaking... We want to work to live not live to work basically.

If it's just a short time though (a year or two) we can probably forgo some of that.

So, is it possible? Or am I dreaming?
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2015
Messages
5
Well,

I would like to work a max of around 40 hours, maybe a little more. That would be 'ideal; (obviosually less is more but at that level it's not too different from what I'm used to now- I'm not looking at doing less hours). This amount is a wish and would perhaps be enough to want to stay permimently.

If that is not realistic I'd like to know what is and then I can take that into consideration.

I've had a look at a few of the other threads and people sometimes talk about IT langauge skills. FWIW I'm most happy with JAVA, C and Python. Though picking up other languages would probably not be a huge challenge. Bit of experience with BASH/UNIX. I like fiddling with hardware. We have covered HTML/CSS/Javascript and SQL though I don't enjoy those areas (web/database) as much. The uni I'm going to isn't ivy leage or anything but it's in the world's top 100 or 50 (depening on list), though this may not mean anything.
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2015
Messages
5
I wanted to edit my post but cannot as the limit expired so I'll just put in the bits that I missed above. Apologies for the spelling errors in the above.

Well,

I do not want to work 80 hour weeks with no holidays. As a geologist I had the option to do 12 hour shifts 7 days a week in mine sites. Though you then get a large number of whole days off so it works out about the say as a 40 hour week across the year.

That's a lifestyle though I wasn't enthusiastic about- living in the middle of nowhere. Middle of nowhere in Australia is quite different from Japan, It's funny to me to hear people talk about rural towns of pop 100K. That's what we'd call a major regional centre...

Anyway. Even at 2.2million I feel trapped by this city. It's a bit hard to explain. I like going to concerts in Japan, there's no artists I ever want to see here. Things like Round One Sports Entertainment centres, also train lines everywhere, the amount of restaurants, shopping, Onsen, Snow, Hiking, Mountains*, narrow streets- there's a lot more things to do. We've done everything here 1000 times over. These are just general examples- there's just a lot more going on.
There are also aspects of society and how people behave that I identify with more. People don't make a racket on trains in Japan for example. People don't litter. The self deprecation. People try and think about what others are thinking. Here many people are bogans and not shy. There is no culture here. People have huge houses in the middle of nowhere (I know someone who commutes 210km (round trip) by car 5 days a week- he does it for the lifestyle apparently but what life do you have sitting in a car for over an entire day a week.). I like the idea of living in a small but convenient location. Sitting on a train is fine, I like public transportation as I can amuse myself just fine.

*Australia has this too but it's in the middle of nowhere. There's no chance of a cafe at the top of your hike for example. Our mountains are very flat. Our beaches win hands down- but I don't like the beach.

There are also negatives: Smoking, Working hours, Smoking, Salaries, Natural Disasters (Australia is very safe), being a foreigner, bureaucracy, Smoking, paper and inefficiency. Discouragement of independent thought. Everyone here is the same 'level' in how we talk to each other- professors for example get called by their first name by students and dress casually. I don't dislike this aspect of Australia.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
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I'm afraid I really don't understand just what it is you're looking for from us.

If you want to come, then come. You have the language skills and professional skills; find a job and start the ball rolling if this is what you want to do. If I may be excused a crudity....sh*t or get off the pot.
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2015
Messages
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I'm afraid I really don't understand just what it is you're looking for from us.
This:
If you want to come, then come. You have the language skills and professional skills; find a job and start the ball rolling if this is what you want to do.
I see a lot of people shot down in flames here. So not having that happen is a good thing.

Apart from that some might say- stay where you are instead you don't know how good you have it, just take as many holidays as you can.

Also, I'm assuming my partner would not be able to find work doing anything but English Teaching? Is this the case?
 
Joined
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The IT degree might solve your work problem, as it could allow you to do telework. That still leaves a visa problem. I know an American who owns his own business and sponsors himself and his wife, but I have no idea how difficult that is.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
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This:


I see a lot of people shot down in flames here. So not having that happen is a good thing.
We reserve that for people whose situation makes them ineligible for a visa to come here to live and work. Sometimes you have to be rather blunt or the point just doesn't get across.

Apart from that some might say- stay where you are instead you don't know how good you have it, just take as many holidays as you can.
Some aren't living your life and won't be standing by your deathbed to hear if you're glad you took their advice or subsequently regretted it, so screw them. Hell, going walkabout is an internationally known trait of the Aussies. Live up to the stereotype.

Also, I'm assuming my partner would not be able to find work doing anything but English Teaching? Is this the case?
You never know until you try. It's always there if needed.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
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It seems like you have a good chance of getting something.

1. Get married. "might as well be" means nothing to immigration. That way, if one of you gets a work visa, the spouse can come on a dependant visa (and I think get part-time work permission as well). If a job opening appears that is perfect for you, you don't want to be in the situation where they want you there now and she can't come with until she sorts out a separate working visa.

2. Start looking on the bilingual job sites - get some idea of salary ranges and what jobs there are that might be possible (you mentioned she's in banking - there may be some finance-related positions even with limited Japanese). You should be able to at least get a feel for what there is that you'll be eligible for, say, right after getting your Masters, and what might open up if you had a couple of years IT work experience.
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2015
Messages
5
Okay, thank you very much for your comments!

:)


Great to know I have a chance and some good practical advice of making sure to look on the bilingual job sites, my list is:

· GaijinPot
· Career Cross Japan
· Daijob
· Career Engine Japan
· hiwork.jp
 
Joined
Aug 20, 2003
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Partner:
Age: 24
Degree: BSc (Mathematics- focus on physics)
English: Native
Japanese: None
Job: Banking : 6.8 million yen (75,000AUD) + 9% for retirement + Bonus (~1-2 million yen) - 40 hours/week - 20 days annual leave + 11 public holidays + 10 paid sick leave days /year
ask yourself what a non-English speaking person have a chance to do in your own country.

Answer: nothing
unless she enjoys handing out tissues in train stations, teach English, try working on a US military base (nationality might matter, though) or stay home.
 
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