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Avishka

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Hi,

I'm from Sri Lanka and I'm looking for a university to study a bachelor's degree in computer science. I cannot speak japanese and computer science isn't available through Global30.
So I'm looking for a university that would teach me japanese in it's first year and then follow the rest of the course in japanese.

Thanks in Advance,
Avishka
 
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Do you really think a university will spend the time, money, and effort to teach you a language that you should already have before coming here? What's more, do you really think you can learn enough of any language (and in spoken and written forms, with multiple levels of politeness) plus the technical terms in just one year to successfully navigate college courses?
 

Avishka

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Do you really think a university will spend the time, money, and effort to teach you a language that you should already have before coming here? What's more, do you really think you can learn enough of any language (and in spoken and written forms, with multiple levels of politeness) plus the technical terms in just one year to successfully navigate college courses?
Think its obvious that I'm the one spending the money and not the university. If you did some research you'd know that there are plenty of colleges all around the world that teach the country's native tongue in their first year.I'll make it easier for you,google German colleges. Also I did find a university in japan that did have this method about half a year ago, I just can't remember which university it was.
Yes, I can.
 
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This isn't Germany, so your information doesn't apply.

Some scholarships here from the government will require you to take 3-6 months of intensive language lessons before you set foot in a classroom for your major. Based on talking to some of those students at the uni where I teach, that amount of time, even with intensive lessons, barely makes a person able to greet, ask simplistic questions, and have extremely limited chats. You are deluding yourself if you think a full year will raise you to the level where you can read a textbook and learn from lectures in Japanese.

You ir the scholarship might pay for some of those lessons, but the school has to shell out facilities and pay for a teacher to give the lessons. At my uni they send students to a bigger one for the lessons. More expense for the uni.

Many people from India and Sri Lanka are hired here to do IT work because of their skills. May I ask why you want the degree from here instead?
 
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Think its obvious that I'm the one spending the money and not the university. If you did some research you'd know that there are plenty of colleges all around the world that teach the country's native tongue in their first year.I'll make it easier for you,google German colleges. Also I did find a university in japan that did have this method about half a year ago, I just can't remember which university it was.
Yes, I can.
There are innumerable places, many of them universities, that will take your money while you study Japanese. Nothing could be easier. Most will also help navigate applying for financial aid, but if you're independent, then no worries.

I think many of the uni-level Japanese programs assume a certain Japanese competency--they'd prefer you to be intermediate rather than beginner.

This is a false/skewered dichotomy:
Some scholarships here from the government will require you to take 3-6 months of intensive language lessons before you set foot in a classroom for your major. Based on talking to some of those students at the uni where I teach, that amount of time, even with intensive lessons, barely makes a person able to greet, ask simplistic questions, and have extremely limited chats. You are deluding yourself if you think a full year will raise you to the level where you can read a textbook and learn from lectures in Japanese.
It mixes BS about 3 month, 6 month, and year long programs, and along the way conflates up the (insulting) goals of barely being able to greet, simplistic questions, and extremely limited chats, with being able to read a textbook and follow lectures. That is, all over the map, and he doesn't say a word about the level at which his apparently very incapable students began their Japanese studies.

Chinese students at my uni, tho they start at the intermediate level, are required to pass level N1 before they graduate (within two years), and virtually all do. You could easily do the same, and I'm sure before they get their chits, that they'd be able to get something out of a Japanese-only textbook or a lecture.

Your choice: think positive, or think negative.

Your desire/motivation is a huge factor. If you really want it, it will happen. If you've got that, I have no doubt that you can do it, and do it much faster than doubters would think.

Good luck! ;)
 
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Chinese students at my uni, tho they start at the intermediate level, are required to pass level N1 before they graduate (within two years), and virtually all do.
Purely out of curiosity, at what JLPT level would you say they start?
 

mdchachi

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Chinese students at my uni, tho they start at the intermediate level, are required to pass level N1 before they graduate (within two years), and virtually all do.
How about the non-Chinese students? I've encountered Chinese people who passed N1 and could barely hold a conversation. They have an advantage when it comes to those tests which are focused on reading/writing. Anyway I'm just curious how the other students have fared in your experience...
 
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Hi,

I'm from Sri Lanka and I'm looking for a university to study a bachelor's degree in computer science. I cannot speak japanese and computer science isn't available through Global30.
So I'm looking for a university that would teach me japanese in it's first year and then follow the rest of the course in japanese.

Thanks in Advance,
Avishka
Oops!

I've asked downstairs at the 国際交流センター, and they tell me that we have about 500 foreign students, about 480 or so are chinese, and the remaining 20 a sprinkling from everywhere. (and two at present are sri lankan)

Also, they DO take students at the beginner level.

If you'd like more information, please send me a private message (e.g., "start a conversation")
 
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Johnnyg,
I don't appreciate being referred to in the third person. If you have something to say or ask about my posts, be more direct.

My "incapable" students usually start at beginner stage, knowing hardly any Japanese. Those represent half the foreign students.the other half are, no surprise, Chinese, and they have the advantage mentioned above, so they don't suffer as much. Not much point in mentioning them, though, because the OP is not Chinese. Let's compare apples and apples.

Regardless of nationality, foreign students at my uni have no language goal imposed on them to graduate. They and their advisors just slug it out and struggle. The school is more concerned with getting their tuition money than efficient communication. Not all schools are like that, but that's the way it is at mine.
 
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