What's new

Japanese Schools with easy admissions?

slink

Kouhai
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
I hope this doesn't sound too ignorant. I told my friend and she kinda laughed at me. I'm looking to transfer to a Japanese University for my 3rd year as an undergrad. My GPA is like 3.7, but my act score was a 14 and my sat was 900 and that brings me down a lot (I was a rebel in High School). Japanese universities are expensive to apply to and I don't want to waste my money with somewhere I know I won’t get in. Does anyone know some really high acceptance rate universities/colleges that are really easy to get into? Or ones that aren't overly selective. Preferably in Kyoto or Hokkaido, but literally anywhere would be amazing. Please? And any advice you'd have for me would be amazing as well.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
1,569
How is your Japanese?
 

slink

Kouhai
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
How is your Japanese?
Well my mother is Japanese and she spoke it to me at home so it's at least intermediate level.
My reading is mostly self-taught. I know all of my hiragana and katakana, but my kanji is sub-par.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
1,569
Well my mother is Japanese and she spoke it to me at home so it's at least intermediate level. My reading is mostly self-taught. I know all of my hiragana and katakana, but my kanji is sub-par.
But you haven't taken any of the JLPT tests, have you? Typically, Japanese universities will have passing level N1 as an admission requirement for foreign students.

JLPT Japanese-Language Proficiency Test

N1-N5: Summary of Linguistic Competence Required for Each Level | JLPT Japanese-Language Proficiency Test

There are a few universities in Japan at which the language of instruction is English, but that is going to severely limit your choice of school and location.

You will also run into the problem of being able to transfer your credits and have them recognized here. Transferring from one university to another is quite rare in Japan. I'm not saying it will be impossible to transfer your credits. I'm just saying that is going to add another layer of complexity and perhaps even limit your choice of schools even further.
 
Joined
May 5, 2013
Messages
552
Reaction score
99
If you're already well into an undergraduate program with a very respectable GPA, maybe it would make more sense to look for study abroad exchange programs where you can do a year in Japan and then come back to finish your degree?
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
Aug 20, 2003
Messages
4,734
Reaction score
272
Hey, Slink. I have a foreign friend who wants to get into an American uni, but he can't read words that are longer than 4 letters in length. He can jabber verbally but only in casual conversation; hearing what an academic person has to say is over his head. What do you think are his chances of getting admitted in the U.S. are? Answer: same as yours in getting in here.

Look at the sarcasm above. Take it in. Figure why any school would allow teachers, admin, and classmates to suffer with someone who can't deal with the local language spoken or written in a typical form. Oh, sure, I've had short-term foreigners come to the HS were I used to work, and they had Japanese language classes every day, twice a day. But they left after several weeks or a few months being unable to understand what the teacher said in class, and they were just left to their own ways to cope. Some joined sports clubs, some got girlfriends, half complained about one aspect of the culture or another instead of learning to adapt to it, etc.

I've also seen some foreigners slug it out at the university where I work. Virtually all of them had good enough Japanese level to communicate verbally, but it was a tough time reading the academic language in the textbooks and listening to the lectures. A couple of key points you should know:
1. In most unis, the standard teaching format is lecture, and nobody asks questions during class. About 10-25% of students sleep through class knowing they'll just have to cram for a final or write a paper for their grade anyway. And if they fail, they can just beg to do another report in order to pass.

2. Students in J unis have far more coursework than in the States. How do you think you'll fare with 15-18 courses per semester? That fills one's weekly schedule to near capacity. It also means 15-18 final exams.

my mother is japanese and she spoke it to me at home so it's at least intermediate level.
Spoke, as in past tense? You're 21 now. When was the last time you used it? Also, can you quantify what "intermediate level" is with some sort of standardized test score? If not, just what can / can't you do with the spoken language?

You've got a head start on the language. Good for you. Why do you want to spend a year here? (You'll be asked to put it on your application anyway, so let's flesh it out now.) Mike asked about transferring credits, and that's a valid question. Some of the students told me they'd have to make up the whole year after they returned because credits didn't transfer. How do you feel about that?
 

slink

Kouhai
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
What do you think are his chances of getting admitted in the U.S. are? Answer: same as yours in getting in here.
I actually find this quite amusing because I am currently enrolled in a school with several (mostly chinese) students who can't speak a single word in English, my dorm-mate (vietnamese) stutters over every single one of her words in English, yet she has a 3.5 GPA and even a scholarship. I know things may be different in Japan, but the contrast is quite amusing to me.

2. Students in J unis have far more coursework than in the States. How do you think you'll fare with 15-18 courses per semester? That fills one's weekly schedule to near capacity. It also means 15-18 final exams.
If that's the case I think i'll be fine honestly. I have a family member who went to Todai for her Masters program and she's never told me anything about 15-18 classes. I texted her a few minutes ago and she says she only took 5 classes a week, no more than 6 before she graduated.

Spoke, as in past tense? You're 21 now. When was the last time you used it?
With a couple of my friends and at my uncle's sushi restaurant where I work. I have family in Japan and call them often (mostly my grandmother). I live in Seattle and there isn't really a Japantown or any Japanese markets where the language is primarily spoken.

Also, can you quantify what "intermediate level" is with some sort of standardized test score?
No I don't have that kind of thing, sorry. I'm unable to quantify my level, but I assume that it's intermediate because I can hold conversations just fine without stumbling.

Why do you want to spend a year here? (You'll be asked to put it on your application anyway, so let's flesh it out now.)
I'm interested in spending a year in Japan because I've only been once before and I want to learn more about the culture, language, art/history, etc. My wanting to go to Japan has almost little to do with my heritage. It wouldn't be enough to just live there and do nothing, I want to learn and grow as a person I suppose.

Mike asked about transferring credits, and that's a valid question. Some of the students told me they'd have to make up the whole year after they returned because credits didn't transfer. How do you feel about that?
That's fine, I wouldn't even mind starting completely over in the Japanese University system if need be.

--
I was going to fly to Japan this summer to take the EJU's in June, but I was beginning to wonder if I'm getting too ahead of myself.
 

slink

Kouhai
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
If you're already well into an undergraduate program with a very respectable GPA, maybe it would make more sense to look for study abroad exchange programs where you can do a year in Japan and then come back to finish your degree?
My school doesn't offer an exchange to Japan. It only offers one to Mexico...and...I don't want to go there.
 

slink

Kouhai
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
But you haven't taken any of the JLPT tests, have you? Typically, Japanese universities will have passing level N1 as an admission requirement for foreign students.

JLPT Japanese-Language Proficiency Test

N1-N5: Summary of Linguistic Competence Required for Each Level | JLPT Japanese-Language Proficiency Test

There are a few universities in Japan at which the language of instruction is English, but that is going to severely limit your choice of school and location.

You will also run into the problem of being able to transfer your credits and have them recognized here. Transferring from one university to another is quite rare in Japan. I'm not saying it will be impossible to transfer your credits. I'm just saying that is going to add another layer of complexity and perhaps even limit your choice of schools even further.
Alright, thanks.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
1,569
Alright, thanks.
No problem. The following provides some links to a practice exam if you would like to take a look at one:

JLPT N1 practice test

At the beginning of the thread it sounded as though you wish to transfer here and graduate from a Japanese university. Now it sounds like you just wish to do a year abroad and return to the U.S. to graduate. Have you considered doing something like attending a language school in Japan for a year abroad? Or some specialty school where you can study some aspect of the culture or learn some specific skills? I think you might find that a valuable option to explore.
 

johnnyG

先輩
Joined
Dec 23, 2010
Messages
976
Reaction score
148
Not a recent number, but my small uni had 480 foreign students, probably 460 of those Chinese, most of whom transfer at the beginning of their junior year and complete degrees here. Virtually all were Japanese majors back in China, but I think they only have had two years of it. (the non-Chinese are east-European, Russian, & south Asian--I'm not sure of their backgrounds)

Key point: The exit (graduation) requirement is N1.

For the Chinese, it is called a 2+2 program--two years at the home school, plus two years here. For the Chinese students, an added advantage is that enough visiting Chinese faculty come over that most students get two degrees, one from here and the other from China.

Their obvious advantage over you is their knowledge of characters (tho not readings, etc); your advantage may be verbal/oral (even grammatical) aspects of Japanese not shared by Chinese.

I have heard that ICU (Mitaka, west Tokyo) has lower standards for foreign students than for locals (also either cheaper fees or scholarships/aid). Also, while it's a bit remote (could be an advantage), check 公立大学法人 国際教養大学 | Akita International University to see if it might suit you. Another might be Admissions & Aid | Ritsumeikan University either in Kansai or their Kyushu campus. And another in Tokyo, Admissions| Sophia University Official Website These latter don't have the N1 exit requirement that my school does. (There are some other similar schools around.)
 
Last edited:

Glenski

Just me
Joined
Aug 20, 2003
Messages
4,734
Reaction score
272
You said "I'm looking to transfer to a Japanese University for my 3rd year as an undergrad."
That's not grad school, so if you come here as an undergrad, my previous statement about the number of classes you take still stands. If you come as a grad student, then of course there are fewer classes. So, which is it?

I am currently enrolled in a school with several (mostly chinese) students who can't speak a single word in English, my dorm-mate (vietnamese) stutters over every single one of her words in English, yet she has a 3.5 GPA and even a scholarship.
This is not surprising. But it is also very suspicious, don't you think?

I live in Seattle and there isn't really a Japantown or any Japanese markets where the language is primarily spoken.
I used to live there, and there was an area with lots of Asian markets including Kinokuniya. I fail to see why you mention this, though. I only asked about speaking Japanese with your mom.

I'm unable to quantify my level, but I assume that it's intermediate because I can hold conversations just fine without stumbling.
What do you mean by stumbling? Keep in mind that they are probably not language teachers and are kind to your mistakes.

I'm interested in spending a year in Japan because I've only been once before and I want to learn more about the culture, language, art/history, etc. My wanting to go to Japan has almost little to do with my heritage. It wouldn't be enough to just live there and do nothing, I want to learn and grow as a person I suppose.
Ok. You can come as a student, on a cultural activities visa, or for work after you get a bachelor's degree. Confirm that your credits will transfer or that you are satisfied in repeating a year back home if they don't, and then decide on those 3 options. Easiest way for degree holders is to teach English, whether directly with employers like eikaiwas or through the JET program.

I was going to fly to Japan this summer to take the EJU's in June, but I was beginning to wonder if I'm getting too ahead of myself.
What are EJUs?
 

slink

Kouhai
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
You said "I'm looking to transfer to a Japanese University for my 3rd year as an undergrad."
That's not grad school, so if you come here as an undergrad, my previous statement about the number of classes you take still stands. If you come as a grad student, then of course there are fewer classes. So, which is it?

This is not surprising. But it is also very suspicious, don't you think?

I used to live there, and there was an area with lots of Asian markets including Kinokuniya. I fail to see why you mention this, though. I only asked about speaking Japanese with your mom.

What do you mean by stumbling? Keep in mind that they are probably not language teachers and are kind to your mistakes.

Ok. You can come as a student, on a cultural activities visa, or for work after you get a bachelor's degree. Confirm that your credits will transfer or that you are satisfied in repeating a year back home if they don't, and then decide on those 3 options. Easiest way for degree holders is to teach English, whether directly with employers like eikaiwas or through the JET program.

What are EJUs?
You're extremely rude and condescending whether you realize it or not.
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
Aug 20, 2003
Messages
4,734
Reaction score
272
You're extremely rude and condescending whether you realize it or not.
Really? Asking you to clarify something as straightforward as that is rude and condescending? I notice you have not even tried to provide an answer, so you make it impossible to understand your situation. That's pretty rude, if you ask me.

Didn't you read Mike's link?
Nope. Way too busy. I often just peek in here while I'm eating breakfast. Not embarrassed at all, just thankful for the explanation. :)
 

tomoni

先輩
Joined
Apr 15, 2014
Messages
169
Reaction score
25
Hello Slink:

Firstly, good luck with your plans (no sarcasm). Let me touch on some of the points that came up.

Language proficiency
In Japan, at least JPLT 2 is required for undergraduate admissions (it may vary by university or program and some places may require N1).

The fact that there are international students at your school means that they scored around 550 on TOEFL (maybe as low as 520- depending on your school) which relatively speaking is, IMO, a bit higher than JPLT N2. Like TOELF, JPLT has no speaking component. That means your speaking ability has no impact on your chance of meeting that Japanese language requirements. Bottom line: you must pass level 2. The next tex is not until July (JLPT Japanese-Language Proficiency Test but if you want to get an idea of where you stand, you could try the J-test (J.TEST実用日本語検定 | TEST OF PRACTICAL JAPANESE The key to passing is the ability to recognize (well enough to read and understand- but it doesn't matter if you know how to pronounce what you can read) Japanese kanji.

Transferring Universities: 編入学試験
Actually, it is not all that rare, among national universities (I do not know about private universities). If you google this :編入学試験 plus the name of the university you want to attend, you can find the conditions. It is quite common for students that failed the entrance exam at their first choice of university with a high GPA at their second choice (where they now attend) to take transfer exams (usually August or Sept). I is usually, a written test(s) and interview.

However, an additional difficulty you will have is the recognition of your HOME university credits. Even if your university has an university level academic agreement (MOA/MOU/AOC, etc.), it is unlikely that they have a credit exchange and recognition system in place. These can take a very long time to set up (because of university and MEXT regulations and requirements, and the regs and requirements from the other university and gov't organization - perhaps regional accreditation body in the US - I DO NOT KNOW).

It is possible (but I do not know if it is these days) that you could be admitted through a special admission process (I have heard of 1 case - anecdotally - years ago). Based upon what I know, at least it would require the strong support of a prof or profs before hand, probably approval of at least 4 committees (International, Admissions, Curriculum, Internal management) the department, the faculty and the dean. So in short, IMO, unless there is already a system in place your chances are very slim of being able to do this. But do not let this discourage you from investigating on your own and checking with universities directly. After all, this is just an Internet forum and you need to check things out yourself.

My Unsolicited Advice

If you want to come to Japan to study, I would suggest that you finish your undergraduate degree and consider graduate studies in Japan. Japan is trying to increase the number of international students (non-Japanese) studying in Japan and there are many options at the masters level. There are also many scholarship chances (a government scholarship will include point to point airfare, tuition wavier and about 140,000 jpy living stipend), as well as university scholarships and other scholarships that you can apply for upon arrival.

You can also study graduate programs in English (or Japanese).
Requirements:
Program conducted in English: To improve your chances for admission you should have passed some JPLT tests (higher is better)
Program conducted in Japanese: At least N2 (depends on institution) but even at N1 you will struggle.
Minimum GPA 2.3 on a 3.0 scale. For more information, ask the Unversity you are applying for.
4 year Bachelor degree from recognized (e.g. accredited) university
Research proposal


Hope this helps
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
1,569
Elvis left the building about a year ago....
 

tomoni

先輩
Joined
Apr 15, 2014
Messages
169
Reaction score
25
Elvis left the building about a year ago....
haha- thanks Mike

what an idiot I am- just got an update on something so did a peek around, and thought, oh I can help here....

haha

oh well

cheers
 
Top