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Japanese and Gods

Joined
Oct 12, 2013
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Obviously this is a request for help with English grammar, and so it should probably be moved to the "Learning English" forum. Be that as it may, I will offer my two cents.
Japanese was born from gods. But japanese not a Gods. Gods is a indians, Indie
1. Japanese were born from gods,
Often difficult even for native speakers to decide if the singular was, or plural were, should be used. In this case, the subject, "Japanese (people)" is plural in nature, and so the verb should be consistent with the subject, hence "were".

2. but Japanese are not gods.
The wheels came off a bit here in the second sentence, which, from my viewpoint ought not to be a separate sentence at all, but should instead be a clause separated by a comma. This, however, is one of those seemingly steadfast rules one learns in grammar school in the US, that turns out is not so steadfast. In fact, "But Japanese are not gods" would work as a fine, independent sentence, however your construction is broken from the beginning, so it needs to be re-worked before it makes any sense. Japanese needs to be capitalized, of course. You are missing a verb, so I have supplied what I suppose to be the intended verb. Finally, gods, which was correctly spelled with a lower-case "g" in the preceding sentence, mysteriously ends up capitalized in this second sentence fragment. Unless there is a compelling reason for the shifting treatment, they should both begin with lower-case letters. The use of the indefinite article "a" is incorrect here, and should be removed.

3. Gods is a indians, Indie.
This sentence is incomprehensible as is, and I recommend rethinking it. Again, the confusion between plural and singular exists, and I do not know how to fix it for you. Gods are Indians is acceptable grammatically, although perhaps not so acceptable logically. God is an Indian, is again acceptable grammatically, although logically it seems to be such a leap from the opening gambit that the reader is left drifting, unable to grab any meaning or value from the words. The final word "Indie" is generally accepted to be an abbreviation of "independent" or "independents" (eg: He records for a new indie label). Surely some other meaning was intended, but the context, in this case, doesn't provide the reader with many clues as to what the intended meaning might be.
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2016
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Obviously this is a request for help with English grammar, and so it should probably be moved to the "Learning English" forum. Be that as it may, I will offer my two cents.


1. Japanese were born from gods,
Often difficult even for native speakers to decide if the singular was, or plural were, should be used. In this case, the subject, "Japanese (people)" is plural in nature, and so the verb should be consistent with the subject, hence "were".

2. but Japanese are not gods.
The wheels came off a bit here in the second sentence, which, from my viewpoint ought not to be a separate sentence at all, but should instead be a clause separated by a comma. This, however, is one of those seemingly steadfast rules one learns in grammar school in the US, that turns out is not so steadfast. In fact, "But Japanese are not gods" would work as a fine, independent sentence, however your construction is broken from the beginning, so it needs to be re-worked before it makes any sense. Japanese needs to be capitalized, of course. You are missing a verb, so I have supplied what I suppose to be the intended verb. Finally, gods, which was correctly spelled with a lower-case "g" in the preceding sentence, mysteriously ends up capitalized in this second sentence fragment. Unless there is a compelling reason for the shifting treatment, they should both begin with lower-case letters. The use of the indefinite article "a" is incorrect here, and should be removed.

3. Gods is a indians, Indie.
This sentence is incomprehensible as is, and I recommend rethinking it. Again, the confusion between plural and singular exists, and I do not know how to fix it for you. Gods are Indians is acceptable grammatically, although perhaps not so acceptable logically. God is an Indian, is again acceptable grammatically, although logically it seems to be such a leap from the opening gambit that the reader is left drifting, unable to grab any meaning or value from the words. The final word "Indie" is generally accepted to be an abbreviation of "independent" or "independents" (eg: He records for a new indie label). Surely some other meaning was intended, but the context, in this case, doesn't provide the reader with many clues as to what the intended meaning might be.
My english not good, thank you for your correct
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2008
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What was the point again? Japanese are not gods; but Indians are gods? (Just to offer an acceptable alternative using a semi-colon.)

So maybe thousands of years ago, two gods, respectively male and female on that particular day, are on their way across the universe, when they decide to stop over on an island in the Pacific (later to be known as Japan) to make whoopee. And one or both of them spit out the ancestors of the race to be known as Japanese.

Then the two gods took up permanent residence in India and reproduced themselves by parthenogenesis, on and on, until they number well over a billion today.

And that is why there are now more gods than believers.
 
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