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I have played tennis since this morning

hirashin

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Dear native English speakers,
I have some questions again.

Q1 Which would be used? If both (a) and (b) are used, what's the difference?
(1a) I have been playing tennis since this morning.
(1b) I have played tennis since this morning.
(2a) I have been playing tennis since I was five.
(2b) I have played tennis since I was five.

Q2 Which would be used?
(a) I have belonged to the dance team for three years.
(b) I have joined the dance team for three years.
(c) I have taken part of the dance team for three years.
(d) I have been a member of the dance team for three years.
(e) I have been a part of the dance team for three years.

3 Which would sound natural?
(a) She's just finished the marathon.
(b) She's just reached/crossed the goal line of the marathon.
(c) She's just reached/crossed the finish line of the marathon.
(d) She's just breasted/broken the tape in the marathon.

4 Which would be used? Which would be the most common?
(a) I haven't seen/watched a film/movie recently/lately.
(b) I haven't seen/watched films/movies recently/lately.
(c) I haven't seen/watched any films/movies recently/lately.

Thanks in advance.

Hirashin
 
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(1) The first two are a bit ambiguous and could be clear with clarifying context. (a) Would mean you started playing tennis this morning but it isn't necessarily the first time you played tennis but with clarifying context could mean that it's your first time playing tennis. (b) This one sounds like it's your first time to play tennis. (c) and (d) Mean that you started at five but aren't necessarily playing in the current moment. But it's continuous so you haven't stopped playing.
(2) (a)yes, (b) if it's been established that you must join each year. (c) "Of" should be "in" in this context. (d)(e) yes.
(3)(a)sounds natural, (b)(c) crossed sounds more natural to me in this context. (d)While not incorrect breasted sounds odd to me in this context. I personally wouldn't prefer it. The context of this implies the runner came in first place if you're not aware.
(4)(c) Sounds most natural to me for all context. (a) Would sound more natural with a clarifying clause. "I haven't watched a movie in a movie theater recently" for example.
 

hirashin

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Thanks for the help, OoTmaster.
Wouldn't 1a mean that I started playing tennis this morning and am still playing it?
 
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Yes. But just like (c) it can mean that you started playing this morning for the first time and aren't at the current moment playing. Certainly you wouldn't continuously play tennis without stopping since the age of 5.
 

nahadef

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Thanks for the help, OoTmaster.
Wouldn't 1a mean that I started playing tennis this morning and am still playing it?
Present perfect continuous can mean something has just recently has stopped as well. Arriving home on a Friday night, my mom would sniff my shirt and ask if I've been smoking (I hadn't), but she thought I had been doing doing that.

In the case of your example, the speaker could be in their tennis wear, drinking lemonade, with some sweat on them. After a shower and a change of clothes, the statement would shift to "I played".
 
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