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Help with working holiday visa

Aaron

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Apr 29, 2015
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Hi guys,

I'm planning to apply for a working holiday visa to Japan for about a year and just have a few questions, sorry if they have been asked before. Would really appreciate it if someone can shed some light on my questions.

1. The conditions states that you should move around every 3 months or so, but does it really matter if I found stable work and I want to stay in the area? It's not against the law and they don't check right?

2. As for teaching English, they require you to be a native speaker. I am an Australian, born in China with Asian appearance, moved to Australia when I was 9 and I suppose my English should be regarded native level. I know Mandarin and Cantonese too. But would they not regard me as a native English speaker if I'm not born in Australia with a foreigner appearance? And does the multilingual help in other types of work instead? My Japanese is above conversational level and maybe near business level, haven't took the JPLT yet but plan to do so, I think I'm either N3 or N4.

3. I want to apply for jobs before I leave but most of the ads on Gaijinpot requires you to be in Japan. Will they completely disregard my application even if I state that I have solid plans to be in Japan by a particular month? I'm planning around July/August right now.

4. Also, when applying for jobs that is listed in both English and Japanese, would it be better to send a Japanese resume with the photo scanned as PDF? Or just a English format resume? I don't really have any Japanese friends and I might need some help translating some of the words....


Thanks in advance!
 
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1. By "move around", does Australia say you actually have to change cities? I didn't think so, and it would be rather inconvenient. As far as I know, you are technically not supposed to find full-time long-lasting work on the WHV. That's why it's on holiday. Few people have reported being checked on, but keep the spirit in mind.

2. You're Australian, whether by birth or naturalization. Nuff said.

3. No, they won't disregard you, but it would help if you could inform potential employers when you actually plan to be here.

4. Just send in the English form.
 

Aaron

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Thanks for the response. Also just wondering if I should omit certain work experience if they are irrelevant (photographer), or too short (4 months)? I had a break after my previous employment which ended February last year and I went overseas for a few months, then doing some casual work now. But since the work is pretty irrelevant, should I just omit it or will it look bad with over a year gap?
 
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Might help to know what sort of jobs you are thinking of applying for and what experience you have for them.
 

Aaron

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Hmm, actually another important thing....Since my passport is in my Chinese name, while I've been known by my English name in work and Uni, so my degree and resume is under my English name. Would that affect the Visa application and job application in Japan? Will they check my working holiday visa and will they reject me if the names don't match or can I explain it?

I believe on the Visa application form that there's a field to fill in any other names as well...will they put a bracket or something on the Visa with that name to avoid confusions?
 

Mike Cash

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Do you have to submit your resume to Immigration? Why would they care?
 

Aaron

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Do you have to submit your resume to Immigration? Why would they care?
Well, they need me to submit my resume to apply for the Visa. But the main concern is looking for work in Japan and there's the passport name on my working visa but my resume and degree is in my English name.
 
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Well, they need me to submit my resume to apply for the Visa. But the main concern is looking for work in Japan and there's the passport name on my working visa but my resume and degree is in my English name.
Resume doesn't matter. You'll need to prove that the name on your degree and the name on your passport is the same person for immigration.
 
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1. Once you're in Japan no one will be checking on where you're working or what you're doing. You should abide by the conditions of your visa if it says you shouldn't work longer than 3 months in any one job, however the reality is it wouldn't be enforced if you did.

2. So long as you've attended school in an English-speaking country for an extended period of time you'll be considered a native-English speaker. If you moved to Australia when you were 9, you'll be fine!

Having additional language skills helps for some jobs, although for English teaching it won't really matter. Being Asian in appearance won't matter. Most Japanese English teachers are too!

3. Usually they state you must be in Japan because they want you to have an appropriate visa already - meaning they don't need to sponsor you. On a Working Holiday Visa they won't have to sponsor you, so you can apply for jobs that require you to already have a visa. Some will want to interview you right away, for that being outside of Japan could be a problem. For others it won't be. That just depends on the position and the urgency with which they want to interview you in person for it.

4. If you are applying to a foreign-owned company, you should send a resume in the Western-style format. If you are applying for a position at a Japanese company, there's nothing wrong with sending a Japanese-style resume written in English and scanned.

A Working Holiday gives you the freedom to travel around Japan and try many types of jobs. Working at hotels, ski resorts, beach resorts, backpackers etc, are all possible on a Working Holiday, but aren't on regular Working Visas. I would recommend that rather than get straight into an English teaching job, you experience other types of jobs first, travel and have fun. You can always find a job willing to sponsor you a Working Visa and stay on in Japan long after your Working Holiday Visa ends if you wish. Search 'Resort Jobs in Japan' and you'll find heaps of fun opportunities.

Best of luck!
 
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BoobooSKIjp wrote:
1. Once you're in Japan no one will be checking on where you're working or what you're doing.
Not necessarily. If you are in a situation like a bar that gets checked by police for whatever reason, you might be questioned. It happens.

Having additional language skills helps for some jobs, although for English teaching it won't really matter. Being Asian in appearance won't matter. Most Japanese English teachers are too!
That means JTEs who are in public/private schools. Most foreigners who teach English are not Asian. In fact, people might even think no English can come out of your mouth just because you have an Asian face.
 
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