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Dragon Eclipse

Daikenen

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To translate Dragon Eclipse (dragon eating the sun) could I say Tatsu Nisshoku? If that works could I add Martial Arts by saying Tatsu Nisshoku Bujitsu? Also "way of life and death" can it be said "Seishi Do"? Lastly, in the attached image would the kanji be correct and laid out correctly? Thank you for your help.
 

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Mike Cash

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How does one practice "the art of death"?
 

Daikenen

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How does one practice "the art of death"?
A bit of a philosophical question really this reference below is wear part of my original question stems from. I appreciate the interest, but an answer to the original question would be more appreciated. Thank you again.

"The life of a martial artist is the way of life and death. We discover peace through the art of war. In learning a martial art we first train our bodies to move, we become aware. Next we train to defend; whether it be ourselves, our loved ones, or the defenseless. A martial artist does not only learn the art of external warfare, but also is enlightened to the battles within. To become proficient in the physical art of self-defense is a fairly easy task, to tame the beast within and understand oneself, one's true potential and one's purpose is truly remarkable.

The art of fighting has always spanned a wide range of injury and control over another. Some may believe that a master of the arts is one who can easily kill with the efficient use of minimal technique, however, I believe a master to be one who is skilled in the art of both life and death. They evaluate each situation, determine the possible outcomes and execute their decisions according to the choices they wanted to make and not the actions that may have resulted from misguided reflex. A master is one who is aware of the many facets of conflict and may resolve such conflict in a variety of manners outside of direct physical intervention. Without mastering oneself, one cannot truly become a master of the martial arts. Those who choose to live the Way come to know it as one of several keys that allow us to open our own paths through life and death.

A martial artist will practice the art of Death to better understand the way of Life. We train first our bodies; properly trained, the body will remember to defend itself without conscious thought. In order to either take a life or save a life one must train the body. Second we train our minds; in reality our mind is always in training, however in this second stage is when the conscious mind becomes aware and we begin to further understand the training. Third we train our spirit; we learn to unite body and mind. It is through this practice that one's spirit will thrive reaching higher levels of awareness and peace within.

The Way of Life and Death is more than a martial art, it is a concept. The goal of this ideal is to train well rounded martial artists, requiring a degree of proficiency in different types of combat. This art is structured purely for the benefit of organized learning practices and beautiful customs. The content itself is only structured within concepts. In this concept of Life and Death, we find a balance of modern and tradition, of order and chaos, of the inner self and the physical self.

The more you travel the path the more you realize that the reason we learn the art of death is so that we may choose to live. We relentlessly practice so that we may never use the skills that we will forever hone. A true martial artist knows that the further you've traveled on the path of the Way, it no longer remains the path. The path becomes a part of you, surrounds you and carries you, you become the Way. Become one with the Way and you shall never separate from it, it will forever be merged with your soul. You do not choose to start the path or end the path; you may only discover the path. Continue the path or lose your way. If you do not yet understand the truth of this, continue the path and you will."
 

lanthas

 
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To be honest, even with all that text I also have no idea what the Art of Death is supposed to mean in the context of a non-lethal sport :). And sentences like this
A true martial artist knows that the further you've traveled on the path of the Way, it no longer remains the path.
don't even make sense grammatically. But I digress.

If you want to express "sun-eating dragon" as opposed to "eclipse that is somehow related to dragons", you have to change the order of the characters: 日食龍

"Bujitsu" is not a word. You probably meant 武術 (bujutsu).

In vertically written Japanese, the columns are read from right to left. So if you want to have people read 日食龍 first, not 生死道, you have to switch the words around from how they are placed now.
 
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Mike Cash

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That wall of occidental ninja babble is what prompted my question to begin with, so there was no need to give it as the (non-)answer to my question.

"Dragon Eclipse" is a ridiculous and meaningless phrase in English and not worth the bother of translating into Japanese so somebody can have kewl and impressive kanji characters that neither he nor anyone visiting the site is going to have the slightest clue about anyway.

A lunar eclipse is when the view of the moon is blocked. A solar eclipse is when the view of the sun is blocked. So a "dragon eclipse" must be when something blocks one from being able to see a dragon. I've been in an ongoing state of "dragon eclipse" for 50 years now.

Are you ready to get pumped
 

WonkoTheSane

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That wall of occidental ninja babble is what prompted my question to begin with, so there was no need to give it as the (non-)answer to my question.

"Dragon Eclipse" is a ridiculous and meaningless phrase in English and not worth the bother of translating into Japanese so somebody can have kewl and impressive kanji characters that neither he nor anyone visiting the site is going to have the slightest clue about anyway.

A lunar eclipse is when the view of the moon is blocked. A solar eclipse is when the view of the sun is blocked. So a "dragon eclipse" must be when something blocks one from being able to see a dragon. I've been in an ongoing state of "dragon eclipse" for 50 years now.

Are you ready to get pumped

Sing along, just replace the word 'heart' with 'dragon.'
 

mdchachi

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Dragons & eclipses do have some history together. For example, Solar Eclipse: The Sun-Eating Dragon or Eclipse Dragon - Dragon City Guide .
Sorry if we are not being helpful. The issue we have here is that nobody can really validate your made-up words. They make sense as far as made up words go. Another common issue is that you're confusing Japan with China. It's China where dragons are embedded deep in the mythologies not Japan.
 

Daikenen

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To be honest, even with all that text I also have no idea what the Art of Death is supposed to mean in the context of a non-lethal sport :). And sentences like this

don't even make sense grammatically. But I digress.

If you want to express "sun-eating dragon" as opposed to "eclipse that is somehow related to dragons", you have to change the order of the characters: 日食龍

"Bujitsu" is not a word. You probably meant 武術 (bujutsu).

In vertically written Japanese, the columns are read from right to left. So if you want to have people read 日食龍 first, not 生死道, you have to switch the words around from how they are placed now.
This reply is actually very helpful, thank you. You are all correct, I apologize for not catching that the order of the words was incorrect and therefore the meaning of "Dragon Eclipse" refers to the object "Dragon" being the one that is eclipsed. You, however, have been quite helpful in reading that the meaning that was being attempted was the sun eating dragon and provided sensible solutions -- so greatly appreciated.

As you've supplied with the Kanji, that makes sense as to the order that needs to be changed. As for how it would be spoken however, could it be said as Nisshoku Ryu? Or if referring to say a branch of Karate for instance could it be said "Nisshoku Tatsu Ryu"? And also would Seishi Do make sense or not at all? Not necessarily if it makes sense conceptually but would it be understood as the way of life and death as a translation?
Thank you again for your help.
 

lanthas

 
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龍 can be pronounced ryuu or tatsu, so "tatsu ryuu" would basically be "dragon dragon". Not sure where you want to go with that.

"Seishidou" makes as much sense as the English "the way of life and death": none at all. There is no risk of fatal injury when karate chopping wooden planks.
There is, however, one "extra" in Japanese that you don't get in English: 生死 is a homonym of 精子. ...Better be prepared for that one student who actually knows some Japanese and starts making immature jokes.
 

Mike Cash

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龍 can be pronounced ryuu or tatsu, so "tatsu ryuu" would basically be "dragon dragon". Not sure where you want to go with that.

"Seishidou" makes as much sense as the English "the way of life and death": none at all. There is no risk of fatal injury when karate chopping wooden planks.
There is, however, one "extra" in Japanese that you don't get in English: 生死 is a homonym of 精子. ...Better be prepared for that one student who actually knows some Japanese and starts making immature jokes.
He meant the latter ryuu to be 流, a common suffix in marital arts.

If he just wants to make up his own martial art, that's fine. I doubt there's anybody who has ever taken a karate lesson who didn't at least have it cross their mind. What I don't get is the desire to give it a false patina of authenticity, antiquity, or exoticness by making up a Japanese name for it. Quite frankly, 生死道 sounds every bit as pretentious, juvenile, and laughable as "The Way of Life and Death" does. So instead of trying to make it look like you got the ridiculous English name by translating some non-existent Japanese name, just go ahead and own it by using only the English name and 'fessing up that it is your own invention. Enduring the eye rolls, snickers, giggles, and guffaws will build character.

So.....outside of attending mortician's school how does one study the "art of death"?
 
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