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confused by the ga and no particles

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Hello I am confused by the ga and no particles. Could you help me decode this example sentence?:
日本人がタイプの女の人紹介してください。
Thank you
 

Mike Cash

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Hello I am confused by the ga and no particles. Could you help me decode this example sentence?:
日本人がタイプの女の人紹介してください。
Thank you
"Introduce me to a girl who is attracted to Japanese guys"

{[日本人がタイプ] の [女の人]} 紹介してください
 
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"Introduce me to a girl who is attracted to Japanese guys"

{[日本人がタイプ] の [女の人]} 紹介してください
Thank you!

So if I add in the beginning a coutry:, eg France:
フランスの日本人がタイプの女の人紹介してください。
Would it mean that a speaker wants to meet a girl from France?
フランスの {日本人がタイプの} 女の人紹介してください。
Or would it mean that the Japanese man should be from France?
{フランスの日本人} がタイプの女の人紹介してください。

I am looking for a grammatical pattern in this sentence :)
 
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Yes that makes sense and it means "Introduce me to a girl whose type is japanese guys from france".

When you use the particle の to group two nouns, it kind of links them together, for exemple :

優しい男の子です。

Here the 優しい qualifies not only the 男 but also the 子, 男の子 is like one same noun.

フランスの人を紹介してもらえませんか。

Here you have to think of フランスの人 as one noun, you can replace it by フランス人.

Do you understand ?
 

Toritoribe

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Note that a comma can change everything. In the sentence フランスの日本人がタイプの女の人を紹介してください。, フランスの modifies 女の人, thus, it means "Please Introduce a French woman whose type is Japanese guys to me".
Furthermore, the meaning can differ also depending on the context. For instance, フランスの日本が好きな女の人 usually only means "a French woman who likes Japan" even without a comma after フランスの. It's not interpreted that フランスの modifies 日本, since フランスの日本 "Japan in France" doesn't make much sense.
Anyway, ~の…が can be ambiguous in some cases, and I think it's similar to a structure "a woman who likes Japanese guys in France" in English. (The word order 日本人を/のことが好きなフランスの女の人 doesn't have this ambiguity, as same as "a woman in France who likes Japanese guys".)
 
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