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A YouTube channel dedicated to sharing more effective, faster, and easier language learning methods.

Joined
Oct 5, 2016
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I personally went through years of hell trying to learn Korean and Japanese with crappy study methods, but now I have found a few methods that work really well for me. All is well now :). I made this video to help others learn Japanese and other languages more effectively, as I think the current learning methods and techniques out now could be a whole lot faster and more efficient.

This video offers a new listening-based approach that is free and easy to do. This is an active listening routine rather than a passive one or immersion. What is comprehensible volume and how can it help us learn faster and easier? Watch here:

 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
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You lost all credibility less than a minute into the video when you read "Anki"....
 
Joined
Oct 5, 2016
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I once had dreams to reform the way we learn languages, but now they have burned and faded into oblivion. I have come up short. I have thrown away and forgotten this oh so important pronunciation when pursuing my career on camera. I have failed. Will I disappear into nothingness or will people just call me a noob?
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Ratings
1,568
When you're posting onto a "Learning Japanese" forum, proposing to revolutionize language learning, and have "Fluent Japanese" in your avatar.....yeah, you kind of chop yourself off at the knees by blowing the pronunciation of the very first Japanese word in the video so badly.

I admire your zeal and your willingness to put yourself out there...but that "oh so important pronunciation" really is a big deal. Nobody saying that word with that pronunciation in a Japanese sentence would be understood by any Japanese speaker, except maybe those who pronounce "manga" with the same vowel error. Japanese only has five vowels and being sloppy with them causes communication problems.
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2014
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I'm not sure I understand. From what I've seen in the video, the method is essentially:
  • Find a word to learn.
  • Search the web for example sentences that use that word (Jisho doesn't always have one).
  • Generate your own listening exercises by running those sentences through text-to-speech (not knowing whether the result is correct, e.g. 辛い = つらい or からい?).
  • Look up any grammar points on random websites (not knowing whether the information you find is applicable or correct).
  • Make your own Anki deck based on the above.

Compared to following a textbook or other course:
  • Learn the ready-made vocabulary list.
  • Read the ready-made example text.
  • Listen to the spoken version of the text as recorded by real people.
  • Read the grammar explanation that follows the text.
  • Use an existing Anki deck for the course you're following.

Can you explain in what way your method is easier and faster?
 
Joined
Oct 5, 2016
Messages
5
I'm not sure I understand. From what I've seen in the video, the method is essentially:
  • Find a word to learn.
  • Search the web for example sentences that use that word (Jisho doesn't always have one).
  • Generate your own listening exercises by running those sentences through text-to-speech (not knowing whether the result is correct, e.g. 辛い = つらい or からい?).
  • Look up any grammar points on random websites (not knowing whether the information you find is applicable or correct).
  • Make your own Anki deck based on the above.

Compared to following a textbook or other course:
  • Learn the ready-made vocabulary list.
  • Read the ready-made example text.
  • Listen to the spoken version of the text as recorded by real people.
  • Read the grammar explanation that follows the text.
  • Use an existing Anki deck for the course you're following.

Can you explain in what way your method is easier and faster?
I apologize for the late reply. I have been thinking for the past week where I'm going with this small channel.

I see your concerns, and the thing is that I'm not trying to oust these textbooks or courses. I'm trying to improve the way we can use them. I'm saying that we can make listening flashcards from all these sentences in our textbooks and test ourselves on them one by one as a means of fast-paced review and to greatly increase listening comprehension. If we wish to learn more about a word in our course, that's where we will need to seek additional example sentences to improve our understand of that new word from multiple angles.

Jisho usually has at least one example sentence, but if not, use google images (basic version). If you want native speaker examples, check it out for 辛い.
辛い - Google Search

Pictures and context can help you determine which reading is used.

And if you don't trust the internet source for a grammar explanation, the book will do just fine. I just wouldn't listen to the same dialogues and conversations over and over or slow them down and expect listening comprehension to go up.
 
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