What's new

気持ちがふさがって/木を見るようにむかいあう

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
547
Ratings
53
I can't make what this really translate into English.
気持ちがふさがって
The first 2 kanji plus ち means: kimochi, which probably means feelings, but the rest, not sure how it would be translated.
Thanks.
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
14,837
Ratings
2 1,539
Can't you reverse-engineer what the dictionary form of ふさがって is and look it up in the dictionary?
 

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
547
Ratings
53
木を見るようにむかいあう
木=tree
見る=see
Not sure about the rest, but would this mean "the trees face each other"?
does mukaiau mean face each other

thanks
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
14,837
Ratings
2 1,539
You ignored を見るように completely. Indeed 木, 見る and むかいあう means "tree", "to see" and "to face each other", respectively, but what is the function of を? Is there no difference between 木見る and 木見る, for instance? It's not enough to look up each word in the dictionary. You need to think about the functions of each word, otherwise you can't understand the meaning correctly.

How about 気持ちがふさがって, by the way? You got the meaning or it's still unclear? Any response to my reply, anyway?
 

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
547
Ratings
53
So would it mean something like : to apply kindness

Can't you reverse-engineer what the dictionary form of ふさがって is and look it up in the dictionary?
I just posted it, sorry about the delay.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
547
Ratings
53
Can't you reverse-engineer what the dictionary form of ふさがって is and look it up in the dictionary?
OK, ふさがる
So would the translation be like: a persons emotions does not leave ones feelings?
Would this be more of a negative statement?

You ignored を見るように completely. Indeed 木, 見る and むかいあう means "tree", "to see" and "to face each other", respectively, but what is the function of を? Is there no difference between 木見る and 木見る, for instance? It's not enough to look up each word in the dictionary. You need to think about the functions of each word, otherwise you can't understand the meaning correctly.

How about 気持ちがふさがって, by the way? You got the meaning or it's still unclear? Any response to my reply, anyway?
I haven't really figured out the difference between を and が yet. I'll go on Kims site to see if can find out the difference.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
14,837
Ratings
2 1,539
OK, ふさがる
So would the translation be like: a persons emotions does not leave ones feelings?
Would this be more of a negative statement?
Yes, that's the dictionary form.
ふさがる【塞がる】
II 〔胸がいっぱいになる〕
それを聞くと胸がふさがる
It depresses me to hear it.
塞がるの英語・英訳 - goo辞書 英和和英

気持ちがふさがる means "to be depressed". You also need to interpret the function of the -te form from the context (cause/reason, continuous usage, etc.).

I haven't really figured out the difference between を and が yet. I'll go on Kims site to see if can find out the difference.
I'm afraid I have to say this, but that's a very basic point you have to get in the early stage of learning Japanese...
 

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
547
Ratings
53
OK, ふさがる
So would the translation be like: a persons emotions does not leave ones feelings?
Would this be more of a negative statement?



I haven't really figured out the difference between を and が yet. I'll go on Kims site to see if can find out the difference.

OK for を  I ate a banana  私はバナナを食べた  that would be transitive
OK for が  He runs fast Kare ga hayakuhashiru かれ が はやくはしる  that would be intransitive
 
Last edited:

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
14,837
Ratings
2 1,539
Then, how about 私バナナを食べた? You don't seem to get it perfectly. What is the function of バナナ in the first sentence and かれ in the second?
 

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
547
Ratings
53
Then, how about 私バナナを食べた? You don't seem to get it perfectly. What is the function of バナナ in the first sentence and かれ in the second?
OK, this is what I think I learned so far
を indicate a direct object of action
Is my example OK: 何をしていますか?
So we use を when action is involve?

が Ⅰunderstand has like 3 meanings to it.
1. direct object of certain verb (which I don't know as of yet)
Sorry, but I'm not understanding the 2 meaning of が

Maybe: 雨がふっている
It’s raining.
The ga here shows some kind of action?

OK, thanks for following up on this, Toritoribe
 

jt_

人生絶賛迷走中
Joined
Oct 12, 2004
Messages
410
Ratings
35
Sorry, but I'm afraid you seem to be confusing yourself here.
You're saying that both が and を mark direct objects and have something to do with action. Does that make any sense to you?

Maybe: 雨がふっている
It's raining.
The ga here shows some kind of action?
Here's a question that you should be able to answer if you understand the difference:
雨がふっている is grammatical and does mean "It's raining", as written.
ふっている would be ungrammatical.
Why?

Here's another:
私がバナナを食べた means "I ate a banana," as above.
バナナ食べた (which likely wouldn't occur in this word order, but could, because Japanese word order has far fewer restrictions than English) would mean something much more terrifying.
What would it mean, and why?

You should make sure you're clear on this before worrying about the far more complex issue of transitive/intransitive verbs.
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
14,837
Ratings
2 1,539
が Ⅰunderstand has like 3 meanings to it.
1. direct object of certain verb
Yes, that's one of the functions of が, but not the main function. I'll change the question. What is the function/element of "He" in the English sentence "He runs fast" or "I" in "I ate a banana"?
 

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
547
Ratings
53
Yes, that's one of the functions of が, but not the main function. I'll change the question. What is the function/element of "He" in the English sentence "He runs fast" or "I" in "I ate a banana"?
OK. I'm not going to say I'm good or any at this, but, on "He runs fast" he, would be a pronoun, I think it to be a personal pronoun and "he " is the subject.
On "I ate a banana" I would be a noun and would be the subject of the sentence.
 

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
547
Ratings
53
Sorry, but I'm afraid you seem to be confusing yourself here.
You're saying that both が and を mark direct objects and have something to do with action. Does that make any sense to you?



Here's a question that you should be able to answer if you understand the difference:
雨がふっている is grammatical and does mean "It's raining", as written.
ふっている would be ungrammatical.
Why?

Here's another:
私がバナナを食べた means "I ate a banana," as above.
バナナ食べた (which likely wouldn't occur in this word order, but could, because Japanese word order has far fewer restrictions than English) would mean something much more terrifying.
What would it mean, and why?

You should make sure you're clear on this before worrying about the far more complex issue of transitive/intransitive verbs.
OK, I really don't understand this. I'm reading up on Kim's place as I have time. But the stuff I'm interested in at the moment is the kanji and although just a few kanji are given, does what I print make any sense at to an English translation.
I'll post other stuff in a new thread then. Again thanks.
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
14,837
Ratings
2 1,539
Yes, "he" and "I" are both the subject, the one who does the action in those sentences. In the same logic, かれ is the subject of かれがはやくはしる, and similarly, 私 is the subject of 私がバナナを食べた. As you can see, both かれ and 私 are indicated by が. This is the main function of が, and exactly why が is often called "subject marker". It's also the same to 雨がふっている. This literally means "rain is falling", i.e., "it's raining".
As jt_-san pointed out, unlike in English, the word order is not so important in Japanese. The key is the particle which is attached right after nouns. Now you can see why 私バナナ食べた(=バナナ食べた) means something much more terrifying, right?

See the following page. It might be helpful than Tae Kim's site. (I believe that this function of が or を must be explained in the textbook you used in the classroom you attended previously, though)
The Particle Ga I
 

musicisgood

Sempai
Donor
Joined
Sep 4, 2015
Messages
547
Ratings
53
This is the main function of が, and exactly why が is often called "subject marker".
Thanks, I think I finally understand that part of "ga".

Now you can see why 私バナナ食べた(=バナナ食べた) means something much more terrifying, right?
That would mean: The banana over took me and ate me all up, right?

See the following page. It might be helpful than Tae Kim's site. (I believe that this function of が or を must be explained in the textbook you used in the classroom you attended previously, though)
The Particle Ga I
The 2 textbooks I did learn used them, but the few example were like "OK, this is how we use them in these examples, and that's about as far as it took them. I'll look again in the books and if possible, post where it went over them.

I'll check out the link you gave me. Thank you.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top