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ている/ていく/てくる

abhishek

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Well, I got some problems with ~ている/ていく/てくる forms.

私はまだ宿題をしていません。
I have not done the homework yet.
{ok present perfect tense.. got it!}

For the motion verbs, I learnt that ているform shows that the motion is completed, and now you exist in that state.
like:
日本に行っています。
Someone has gone to Japan and is there now.

and then why it's future tense here:
1. 君をいつまで思っているのかな?
I wonder how long will I keep thinking of you?
{future tense most probably due to いつまで ?}

2. さきに行っているよ。
I'll go and be there before you.
{future tense? can't it mean something like this: I am already here before you? }


ていく vs てくる

えんぴつを学校に持っていく?
Are (you) taking pencil to school?
えんぴつを学校に持ってくる?
Are (you) bringing pencil to school?
{ Ok 持っていく/くる is easy to understand.}

but what about the below one, is there any difference?

君を好きになっていく。
君を好きになってくる。



よろしくお願いします。
 

Toritoribe

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For the motion verbs, I learnt that ているform shows that the motion is completed, and now you exist in that state.
It's not about all motion/action verbs but about punctual verbs(瞬間動詞) in motion/action verbs. Durative verbs (継続動詞) also belong to motion/action verbs, but the ~ている form of a durative verb expresses the (present) progressive tense (e.g. 歩いている).

1)
思う is a durative verb, so 思っている means "to keep thinking / have been thinking". And yes, the future tense "will" is from いつまで.

2)
In this case, it's more likely the speaker's will "I'm going to go~", not future.

what about the below one, is there any difference?
君を好きになっていく。
君を好きになってくる。
https://jref.com/forum/learning-japanese-64/%82%C4%81e%81%7B%8Ds%82%AD%81e%81%7B%97%88%82%E9-%5Bgrammar-49088/

The meaning is almost the same between those two sentences. ~ていく is an expression from the viewpoint of "now", whereas ~てくる is from the one of "future".
 
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Umm, what? Maybe I am wrong, but as far as I'm concerned, ~ている means you are currently doing an action.

「私はまだ宿題をしていません。」 I read that as "I am not doing my homework (at the moment)".

「日本に行っています。」I read that as "I am currently going to Japan". My grammar is probably wrong since this statement doesn't make sense because it implies that the person is currently driving to the airport or flying on a plane or something since he is dynamically going to Japan, but that's how I read it. However, as in English where "I am currently going to Japan" means that you are going to soon or that is in your near schedule, not literally currently going to Japan, that might also apply to Japanese.

「君をいつまで思っているのかな?」This is kinda confusing, but I read that as "It seems I'm always thinking about you...".
 

Toritoribe

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then how will you say:
1. Old man is dying.
2. Old man is going to die.

死ぬ is a state change verb so I can't use 死んでいる..
1)
死にかけている
2)
死にそうだ

Something like your example テレビを見続ける can work here?
Yes.


Umm, what? Maybe I am wrong, but as far as I'm concerned, ~ている means you are currently doing an action.

「私はまだ宿題をしていません。」 I read that as "I am not doing my homework (at the moment)".

「日本に行っています。」I read that as "I am currently going to Japan". My grammar is probably wrong since this statement doesn't make sense because it implies that the person is currently driving to the airport or flying on a plane or something since he is dynamically going to Japan, but that's how I read it. However, as in English where "I am currently going to Japan" means that you are going to soon or that is in your near schedule, not literally currently going to Japan, that might also apply to Japanese.

「君をいつまで思っているのかな?」This is kinda confusing, but I read that as "It seems I'm always thinking about you...".
Simply, you are wrong.
 

abhishek

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Umm, what? Maybe I am wrong, but as far as I'm concerned, ~ている means you are currently doing an action.

「私はまだ宿題をしていません。」 I read that as "I am not doing my homework (at the moment)".

「日本に行っています。」I read that as "I am currently going to Japan". My grammar is probably wrong since this statement doesn't make sense because it implies that the person is currently driving to the airport or flying on a plane or something since he is dynamically going to Japan, but that's how I read it. However, as in English where "I am currently going to Japan" means that you are going to soon or that is in your near schedule, not literally currently going to Japan, that might also apply to Japanese.

「君をいつまで思っているのかな?」This is kinda confusing, but I read that as "It seems I'm always thinking about you...".
:p
ている is not just '-ing'
You should probably read this:
uses of the te-form
 

nekojita

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I remember my teacher explaining the state thing with the difference between 結婚していません and 結婚しません!

来ている and 行っている seem to be two that lots of people stumble on, because often the "current action" grammar is taught before the "ongoing state" and because reading them as "coming"/"going" makes sense at first glance.
 

abhishek

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I remember my teacher explaining the state thing with the difference between ナ停?ケツ債・窶堋オ窶堙??堋「窶堙懌?堋ケ窶堙ア and ナ停?ケツ債・窶堋オ窶堙懌?堋ケ窶堙アツ!

窶藩??堙??堋「窶堙ゥ andツ ツ行窶堙≫?堙??堋「窶堙ゥ seem to be two that lots of people stumble on, because often the "current action" grammar is taught before the "ongoing state" and because reading them as "coming"/"going" makes sense at first glance.
:thumbsup:
I think I got it now.
ナ停?ケツ債・窶堋オ窶堙??堋「窶堙懌?堋ケ窶堙ア = I am not married.
ナ停?ケツ債・窶堋オ窶堙懌?堋ケ窶堙ア = I am not getting married.
 

nekojita

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Yes, quite so.

Of course, there might be cases where you'd use "結婚しません" (I'm not marrying him!), or 結婚します (I'm getting married in August), but for talking about your current marital state you would use 結婚しています・いません

One other thing to watch out with 行って is that it is also the te-form of 行う (おこなう), and you will see 行っています quite often referring to doing/organising something (particularly in terms of official business, i.e. "carrying out repair work" or "conducting a survey").
 
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:p
ている is not just '-ing'
You should probably read this:
uses of the te-form
Umm, that link kinda just reinforces my point. The way I learned it, ~ている is used for enduring states or actions, something that you are doing over a period of time, not at one point. ~ていく and ~てくる are used differently, but (I just looked over the link you gave me, not word by word but did a little long skim at it) ~ている is for enduring states. So yeah. That's what I was saying.
 
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1)
死にかけている
2)
死にそうだ

@SusuKacangSoya Simply, you are wrong.
But how am I wrong? The sentence you gave for "The old man is dying" says what I'm trying to say.

I just looked over what I typed, and I think I might've typed it a bit confusingly. What I meant was, ~ている means that you are doing an action over a period of time, not a single-occurance thing. I would've gave the same sentence you gave for (1), because the sentence says that the old man is dying...as in, not going to die, not being dead, he is die-ing. The -ing part is how I see ~ている.

There might be another use for it, but could you tell me what it would be then? As of the moment I only know one way ~ている is used.
 

Toritoribe

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So what is your interpritation of お客さんがうちに来ている? Why this sentence means "A guest IS in my house now", not "A guest is in the way to my home"?

Your problem is that you don't understand a fact that ~ている form expresses different aspects of verbs depending on the type of the verb.
 
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Err, wut? Toritoribe, are you referring to the OP or me? If it was me, I'd read that as "A guest is coming to my house". Not IN the house, because that would be うちにいる.

I might be getting confused here, so I'll pull out of the discussion. Sorry about that.

*EDIT* Wait, unless you mean that sentence does indeed mean "A guest is in my house", in which case then yes, I am wrong and confused over how things work here.

*EDIT 2* If what I just said above in the edit is true, then I believe that the sentence would mean "A guest is in my house now" because the 来る here would mean "visit" instead of literally "come" based on the context of the sentence. However, I'd rather use something like 伺いっている instead of 来ている to clarify in such a case.

*EDIT 3* Just realized 伺いっている would probably be more confusing than 来ている in such a case...unrelated question, but in such a case, if I wanted to say "A guest is currently visiting my house", how would I say it?
 

abhishek

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Umm, that link kinda just reinforces my point. The way I learned it, ~ている is used for enduring states or actions, something that you are doing over a period of time, not at one point. ~ていく and ~てくる are used differently, but (I just looked over the link you gave me, not word by word but did a little long skim at it) ~ている is for enduring states. So yeah. That's what I was saying.

Well then don't skim it, read carefully after first 6 examples, you will see 知っています, 帰っている, 来ている even 結婚している too!
 

Mike Cash

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伺いっている? what is that?
 
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referring to you of course...
moreover sentence does indeed mean "A guest is in my house".
Ah, okay. Just took a careful look, and I saw what you meant. Sorry for derailing the topic.

*EDIT*
伺いっている? what is that?
I tried to write the ~ている form of 伺う (うかがう). It's likely not the proper verb to use here, but that's kinda the first verb that came into my mind when I thought "visit".
 

Toritoribe

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the -te iru form of 伺う: 伺っている / うかがっている

You can't use うかがう here, by the way. うかがう is a humble verb of 来る / 行く, so a guest can't be the subject. You must use an honorific verb いらっしゃる instead.
 
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Mike Cash

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ている/ていく/てくる

Ah, okay. Just took a careful look, and I saw what you meant. Sorry for derailing the topic.

*EDIT*

I tried to write the ~ている form of 伺う (うかがう). It's likely not the proper verb to use here, but that's kinda the first verb that came into my mind when I thought "visit".
Don't you think it a little odd to offer opinions on the usage/meaning of a form you quite obviously haven't even learned how to conjugate yet?
 
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Don't you think it a little odd to offer opinions on the usage/meaning of a form you quite obviously have even learned how to conjugate yet?
Yes, I do find it a bit odd now. I'm used to seeing opinions being tossed around in other places I've been in in the internet, and this is technically the first serious forums I've ever been in, so I'm unused to absolutely not replying if I am not sure. I'll come back in a few days after taking a look at these forms, then I'll see if I can give some proper answers.
 

nekojita

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Which movie you like best is an opinion. When it comes to matters of grammar, though, there is usually a right and a wrong.

Its okay to be wrong, if you learn something from it. As a general rule, if I find my opinion on grammar or meaning conflicting with toritoribe先生 I presume I have misunderstood something. This rule has worked out pretty well.
 

Toritoribe

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That's not true. I have made mistakes, of course, and apologized about that many times in this forum.:relief:
 
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