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だけで / ところ / 遅れる / 一団, 一家

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Hi,

1. ここにいてドラゴンに立ち向かうほうが、ダドリーと一緒のプリベット通りに戻るよりはましだ。それがはっきりしただけで、ハリーは少し落ち着いた。

Does だけで mean that nothing else was needed to calm him, or does it mean that this was the only thing that calmed him?

2. セドリックが大広間を出ていくところを見ていて、ハリーの気持ちは決まった。

What is the difference in this sentence between saying ところ and の? Does ところ refer to a physical location?

3. 「ハリー、遅れるわよ。もうすぐベルが鳴るのに・・・」

From this sentence alone, is there any way to guess who the likely subject of 遅れる is -- whether the speaker alone, Harry alone, or both of them?

4. Is there any logic or reason apparent to native speakers as to why nouns such as 一団 or 一家 are prefixed by 一? I don't see anything particularly special about such nouns to explain it, and if 一 is to indicate singular rather than plural, then why isn't it done with all nouns?
 

Toritoribe

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1)
That's the former; "just because". それをはっきりさせることだけが、ハリーを落ち着かせた。 is for the latter meaning(だけで vs だけが).

2)
ところ is a nominalizer there as same as の. ところ refers to an actual situation, so 彼が出ていくところを止めた means that he was really about to go out. Whereas 彼が出ていくのを止めた can be used also for just a plan, i.e., he might not start the action yet. ところ and の are interchangeable in your example, though (because of the main verb 見た).

3)
That's Harry alone or Harry and the speaker because of わよ. This is a caution to the addressee. If that's 遅れるのよ, the subject is the speaker alone or the speaker and Harry.

4)
Those words are more likely a compound word rather than "一 + noun", similar to ひとかたまり, 一滴[ひとしずく], 一握り, 一息[ひといき] or 一説. The original functions of these words seem to be close to counters.
 
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Those words are more likely a compound word rather than "一 + noun"
The original functions of these words seem to be close to counters.
To me, combinations such as 一枚, 一杯, etc. seem very much like 一 + 枚, 一 + 杯 (correct me if I'm wrong). However, even though 一団, 一息 etc. may have originally been related to counters, they have now evolved into something that feels different from 一枚 etc., is that right?
 

Toritoribe

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Yeah, that's right. In fact, 二団 or 二家 doesn't make much sense (or at least not common).
 
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I meant to ask you another question about this too, which is the reason for the English word ドラゴン rather than the native Japanese word. Does it have any different connotations? Is it just author's choice? Or more "fashionable"?
 

Toritoribe

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I think ドラゴン often refers to Western dragon, such like the one in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien (and in the Harry Potter series, of course), whereas 龍 is more likely for Chinese dragon. The distinction is not strict, so they can be used interchangeably, though.
 
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If you look up ドラゴン on Wikipedia, it mostly discusses the western-type "dragon", and has a little disambiguation link pointing you to 竜 as a separate thing:
東洋の伝説上の生物については「」をご覧ください

(there's also a little paragraph discussing the differences/uses of ドラゴン・竜・龍・西洋竜)
 
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